Judaïsten

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“Judaizers” is predominantly a Christian term, derived from the Greek verb iouda “live according to Jewish customs”, see Ioudaios). This term is most widely known from its single use in the Greek New Testament (Galatians 2:14)[1] where Paul publicly challenges Peter for compelling gentile converts to Early Christianity to “judaize”,[2] also known as the Incident at Antioch.

Wherefore the law was our schoolmaster to bring us unto Christ, that we might be justified by faith. -Galatians 3:24

If therefore perfection were by the Levitical priesthood, (for under it the people received the law,) what further need was there that another priest should rise after the order of Melchisedec, and not be called after the order of Aaron? 12 For the priesthood being changed, there is made of necessity a change also of the law. 13 For he of whom these things are spoken pertaineth to another tribe, of which no man gave attendance at the altar. -Hebrews 7:11-13

39 Categories of Activity Prohibited on the Jewish Sabbath

1. Sowing 2. Plowing 3. Reaping 4. Binding sheaves 5. Threshing 6. Winnowing 7. Selecting 8. Grinding 9. Sifting 10. Kneading 11. Baking 12. Shearing wool 13. Washing wool 14. Beating wool 15. Dyeing wool 16. Spinning 17. Weaving 18. Making two loops 19. Weaving two threads 20. Separating two threads 21. Tying 22. Untying 23. Sewing stitches 24. Tearing 25. Trapping 26. Slaughtering 27. Flaying 28. Tanning 29. Scraping hide 30. Marking hides 31. Cutting hide to shape 32. Writing two or more letters 33. Erasing two or more letters 34. Building 35. Demolishing 36. Extinguishing a fire 37. Kindling a fire 38. Putting the finishing touch on an object 39. Transporting an object between a private domain and the public domain, or for a distance of 4 cubits within the public domain.

lees ook:

De judaisering van het christelijk geloof (pdf)